Friday, February 14, 2020

Old Mail Tree


The gnarled Fremont cottonwood tree in the heart of the Fruita Historic District in Capitol Reef National Park has had a long life. Planted in the late 1800s, it has lived longer than expected. Starting in 1918, it was the place where mail was transferred from a carrier in Torrey to another carrier continuing downriver. Later, mailboxes were attached to the tree giving the settlers a place for contact with the outside world. I spent a happy day in September designing and knitting this quick knit while sitting under the old tree. This artwork was produced under the Artist in Residence Program at Capitol Reef National Park.. This artwork was produced under the Artist in Residence Program at Capitol Reef National Park.

Saturday, February 8, 2020

Wingate Sandstone


Wingate sandstone is found all over the Colorado Plateau and is one of the stars of Capitol Reef National Park. Forming sheer cliffs and spectacular bluffs it ranges in color from light yellow to dark orange to rusty red depending on its age of oxidation. Wingate was the first thing that caught my attention during my stay at Capitol Reef. I love the deep rugged texture of the cliff faces. I tried to capture that texture in something that would hug you like the landscape does. This artwork was produced under the Artist in Residence Program at Capitol Reef National Park.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Fruita


The historic town of Fruita, within Capitol Reef National Park, is no longer inhabited by pioneers. But visitors can still pick ripe fruit from the lush orchards under the looming orange cliffs of the Waterpocket Fold. I was lucky enough to live there for the month of September and couldn’t get enough of this colorway -- green against the orange cliffs. This artwork was produced under the Artist in Residence Program at Capitol Reef National Park.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Rabbitbrush


Rabbitbrush was in spectacular bloom last September in Capitol Reef when I was staying there. The yellow flowers are so beautiful next to the red rock. I knit this piece from a skein of hand spun and hand dyed alpaca that I bought at a shop in Torrey. It is locally grown at Circle Cliff Ranch from an alpaca named Probee and hand spun by Diena. I designed Rabbitbrush specifically for this local yarn. 

From the pattern:
Rabbitbrush is a member of the Aster family with yellow flower heads arranged in dense, rounded or flat-topped clusters at the ends of the branches. Rabbitbrush flowers bloom from August to October as other plants are fading, providing vivid fall color against the red rock canyon walls in Capitol Reef. This artwork was produced under the Artist in Residence Program at Capitol Reef National Park.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Sandstone Cliff


The holidays were productive for getting artwork done for my artist-in-residence for Capitol Reef. First one finished was this marathon shawl inspired by the beautiful sandstone cliffs that surrounds the park. I really miss living in the park but luckily I can surround myself with the landscape with this beauty. 

From the pattern:

Nearly 10,000 feet of sedimentary strata were deposited in Capitol Reef National Park. This layer upon layer of sedimentary rock records nearly 200 million years of geologic history. Rock layers in Capitol Reef reveal ancient environments as varied as rivers, swamps, deserts, and shallow oceans. Fossils found in these rocks give clues that these sandstone layers were deposited when the region was at or near sea level, far below the current elevation. This artwork was produced under the Artist in Residence Program at Capitol Reef National Park.

Monday, September 30, 2019

What? Where did the month go?



I can’t believe the month is over at Capitol Reef. I know I didn’t blog at all while here at the park but hopefully you followed along with my almost daily Instagram posts. I leave tomorrow with a heavy heart but full of inspiration and ideas for projects.

I hope to be better at posting progress on my knitting inspiration for the next year or so. Here are some of the most beautiful landscapes I have seen during my month at this really spectacular national park.







Wednesday, September 4, 2019

I’m here in Capitol Reef



I have finally arrived in Capitol Reef National Park. I am blown away by the beauty and inspiration already even though I have been here less than a day. The house that the park provides is amazing. Just look at the view out my back window!



I have already started knitting a Navajo sandstone inspired piece while sitting by Navajo sandstone.


And have already done all the touristy things including picking peaches at the historic orchards and buying an amazing pie at the Gifford House. The next month as artist-in-residence is going to be fantastic!